A New Open Source Web Site

We have a new web site and a new domain!

Main Page

It’s Open Source

It would make no sense to be developing a language that is Open Source and not having an Open Source web site and documentation. We worked by gradually porting all the old site from the previous platform to Jekyll. The new site is all written in Markdown (actually Kramdown, a flavour of Markdown) and hosted on GitHub. In fact, we’ve made it really easy to contribute. On nearly every page there is an Edit Page icon:

EditPage

Contributions welcome

There are still a few items pending on the web site. We still need to port the entire grammar over which is in the works. In addition the API documentation still needs porting over too. A lot of them we’re doing, but as this is an Open Source project, any and all contributions are welcome. So if you’re not ready yet to contribute to the Kotlin source code, please contribute with documentation, tutorials and other things. We can use all the help we can get.

If you want to contribute, make a fix, or anything, just click on it and edit directly on GitHub in the browser and send a pull request. You can of course also fork the repository and make changes locally with Jekyll. Instructions on the repository page.

New Content

The Docs sections is the entry point to all resources Kotlin.

FAQ

In addition to having ported the existing documentation over, we now have new tutorials, video screencasts and even more documentation. We also list all Events as well as a section on external Resources where we feature OSS projects written in and for Kotlin.

Kotlin Koans

Along with the site we’ve published a new tutorial which is a series of exercises in the form of failing unit tests which allow you to get up to speed quickly, not only with the Kotlin syntax but also with some idioms.

Can you make them all pass?

Community Resources

We have gathered most community resources on a single page.

Take a look. Try it out. Let us know what you think.

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9 Responses to A New Open Source Web Site

  1. pilgr says:

    Thanks for huge update! Looks awesome!

  2. zhaopuming says:

    I translated all kotlin documents into Chinese in 2013, and was trying to push it upstream in vein. So now the koltin website is open source, can I update my translation and push it here? Were should I put it?

    • Hadi Hariri says:

      Hi,

      Apologies for the delay in response. We’re trying to figure out the best way to organize this. Is there an email I could reach you on?

  3. Bart says:

    At the old domain it was possible to convert the whole tutorial tree into pdf format. Why there is no such option at the new domain?

    Whether tutorials at the old and new domains match each other 100% or not?

    • orangy says:

      We are looking into employing something like http://gitbook.io to make a “book” out of the site. As a workaround, if you need to read it offline, you can clone the git repository and use some markdown reader, or even host site locally via Jekyll. Not an easy option, I understand. We’ll do it better.

    • Hadi Hariri says:

      We’re working on a solution for this. Stay tuned.

  4. Guangyu HE says:

    After reading the source code of Files.kt of standard-lib, I have a few questions:

    1 why File.appendText is declared as public, and File.forEachLine isn’t ?

    2 I can use File.forEachLine && File.appendText in the same manner in my program.
    For user, what’s the difference of declaring a method public ,or default, such as appendText && forEachLine?

    • orangy says:

      The IO part of standard library is not yet designed and functions there are somewhat ad-hoc. Recently we were focused on collections part and very soon will start designing and implementing IO and Text parts.

      Some functions are internal by mistake, because until recently Kotlin didn’t check visibility across modules and public & internal were essentially the same. We will fix such cases in the nearest future.

  5. Sergey says:

    Hello. I want to replace GWT with Kotlin, but I can’t find any list of Kotlin features available during JavaScript generation. I want to know, could I implement some GWT features like Code Splitting (Split output JS to some parts which can be downloaded when they will be required), manipulate DOM, generate JS only (I mean, GWT allows to remove theme completely from compilation), create ajax requests.

    Thanks.

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