ReSharper Personal and Academic Licensing Changes

Last year, we asked for your input in order to decide whether to make a transition to upgrade subscription-based licensing for ReSharper. Upon reading through your feedback and undertaking internal research, we introduced a commercial license including 1-year upgrade subscription.

Further on we thought that it would be appropriate to do something similar for personal and academic licenses. What we did was just drop the traditional, per-major-version personal and academic licenses and replace them with licenses empowered with 1-year subscription. This is exactly how most of our products (such as PhpStorm, RubyMine, AppCode or WebStorm) are licensed: when buying a license, you can upgrade to any major and minor releases during 1 year.

Starting June 1, whenever you buy a new personal or academic license or upgrade your existing one, you get 1 year of free upgrades, effectively meaning that you receive the upcoming ReSharper 8 for free.

Unlike the commercial license that can be purchased both with or without 1-year upgrade subscription, personal and academic licenses default to the subscription model, and do so without price increase. As a result, if you’re a personal or academic customer, there’s no more pain of buying a license and finding out in several months that you need to pay again in order to get the latest update.

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38 Responses to ReSharper Personal and Academic Licensing Changes

  1. Peter Šulek says:

    So when i bought personal licence last year december 21 an version 7.0 of Resharper, what do i need to do now?

  2. Trevor Dennis says:

    My only issue with this is that if it takes you 3 years to go from version 8 to version 9, I will have paid 3 times instead of once for each major version. Or when I upgrade to 8 if it takes more than 1 year for 8.1 to be released, I will have to pay again for the “chance” you release an update within that year.

    Maybe I’m just scared that Resharper is so powerful now that you might right out of new ideas for features to add… I’m writing this just after moving 10 classes in my project to a new namespace and having Resharper automatically update the other 70 source files in 5 seconds :)

  3. ta.speot.is says:

    Thanks for subscription-like licensing for the Personal tier.

    @Peter I’m interpreting “Starting June 1″ and “I bought … last year” to mean that you (and I) have to cough up some cold, hard cash before we get covered by this.

  4. Student says:

    So if I did get an academic license within a year can I get an upgrade to R#8 when it is released?

  5. Daniel says:

    What about those who have been purchasing R# since version 5?
    Or have renewed their license just before the grand deductions day?

  6. Mark says:

    So having purchased a personal R# 7 only a couple of months ago I will have to purchase an upgrade to get version 8? There will be no ‘if you bought within the last 6/12/X months you get free upgrade’ scheme running?

  7. Scully says:

    This sucks massively, I hope any personal license buyers are up in arms about it. Basically, instead of being able to buy a ReSharper 7 license when version 8 hits beta and get a free upgrade to 8, including all minor releases, it means that in a year you’ll no longer get bug fixes to a product you’ve paid for. On top of that, what if you want to skip a version? As I understand what’s on the Jetbrains website, you pay full price. And the cheek of saying that there are no price increases! There should be a huge price decrease when moving to a subscription model! Seems a little like Jetbrains are just copying DevExpress’ with their crappy subscription model. Am seriously considering going cold turkey and trying to live with vanilla VS.

    I really hope Jetbrains don’t try pulling this crap for IntelliJ too, otherwise it’ll be time to find another IDE. What a shame, the personal license scheme was such a good idea.

  8. RH says:

    @Scully: I’m in full agreement. Now we not only might not get all minor releases for a version we’ve paid for, as you say, we effectively get locked into a perpetual annual license fee! Really unhappy about this.

  9. Frazell Thomas says:

    My understanding of how this new license scheme is going to work is that we’ll still get the right to use the version of ReSharper we have forever, but we’ll also get the ability to upgrade free within a year. Meaning if we buy it now with the subscription we’ll get ReSharper 9 if it drops within a year, but that won’t affect our ability to skip ReSharper 9 and stay with 8.

    What I’m really unclear about is how minor updates are affected. Do we need this subscription to get a version upgrade to 8.1? I hope not as this has never been the case in the past. The additional question is what happens when you skip an upgrade? How will renewing the subscriptions be priced and work.

    But if we get minor upgrades for free irrespective of subscription status and keep access to whatever major version we got during our subscription into perpetuity this could be not that bad.

  10. @Peter Šulek
    The best way for you is to wait until v8 comes out next month and buy an upgrade from your current license to v8. Your new license would include 1 year of free upgrades to any new versions that we would release.

  11. @Trevor Dennis The 3-year hiatus option that you’re referring to is only theoretially possible: we’re too full of ideas how to improve ReSharper. Recent history shows that we’re releasing major versions approximately once a year and we’re not planning to make the release schedule any less frequent.

  12. @ta.speot.is You’re welcome. The intention is to move to a single licensing scheme across all products, otherwise customers are getting confused (and annoyed in case of a purchase or upgrade months ahead of a major release)

    As to your interpretation, this is correct: the upgrade-subscription licensing scheme only works for new licenses and upgrades purchased since June 1 and isn’t backdated.

  13. @Student If you have purchased an academic license before June 1, you’ll have to buy an upgrade as soon as v8 comes, and as soon as you do so, you’ll have 1 year of free upgrades.
    If your academic licenses was purchased on or after June 1, then yes, you’re eligible for a free upgrade to v8 and any other updates that we’re releasing within a year of your purchase.

  14. Jeff says:

    I don’t think this abrupt change in licensing is right. Seems like anyone who purchased a v7 within the last 6 months or so should get grandfathered into a v8 “subscription”. Not only are we not receiving the benefit of a free upgrade as has been offered in the past, it sounds like we must pay a full upgrade fee also. I think there should be a grace period or pro-rated upgrade for people who have just made their purchase within the last 6 months at least. I also think that this whole thing sounds really like a pseudo-benefit, I mean are the roadmaps for major features going to be accelerated or something? I find it improbable that ReSharper will be releasing more than 1 major update every year, and if there is not new features in the point releases, then what are we really paying for? Bugfixes to a product purchased should not be something that a company charges for by forcing users to a subscription…

  15. David Lay says:

    @Jura
    What you could do, is do a time-limited offer on the upgrade price when v8 arrives, so that we, all long time personal users, can make the upgrade without feeling left out in this new licensing model.
    Personally, I find this new move to subscriptions a great thing.

  16. @Daniel
    What do you mean when you say “the grand deductions day”?
    I’m also not sure how the change in licensing specifically affects those who have been purchasing R# since version 5. Can you clarify please?

  17. @Mark
    Yes. This is exactly the problem that we’re trying to avoid by moving to the upgrade subscription scheme, ensuring that no one is going to get annoyed by the prospect of paying for an upgrade several months after the initial purchase. The intention is to make sure that if a customer is willing to keep up to date with new releases, he/she pays for upgrades once a year, in a predictable fashion, so it’s easier for budget for the expense.
    The transition is not backdated though, so this time, indeed, if you want to move to v8, you have to buy an upgrade.

  18. Frazell Thomas says:

    @Jeff

    The way I understand this* is that, as I mentioned earlier, we’re getting the same licensing model we are used to (free .X releases) with a prepayment for the major (X.) releases. If this is the case then this isn’t that bad (provided ReSharper updates yearly without ignoring bugs that need to be fixed in minor releases and they clearly spell out the story if we don’t subscribe for every release).

    * See: http://www.jetbrains.com/resharper/buy/buy.jsp#commercial_upgrade

  19. Sven says:

    @Frazell
    the link is for commercial licenses where you have to models
    a one year subscription and what you have currently, buy major version and get all minor updates for free (problematic here is already the situation you still use an older version where no bugs are fixed anymore)

    personal will only have the one year subscription and what it means is during your subscription period you get all updates, major and minor.
    but after you subscription ends you can’t use new updates, no matter if major or minor.
    people who upgrade on each major version will benefit from it. people who don’t upgrade do not as they will also have to pay for minor patches.

    correct me if I’m wrong

    still waiting for some subscription quotation if I use several jetbrains products^^

  20. Sven says:

    what I mean with quotation is a package like “jetbrains c# universal subscription” containing r#, dottrace and dotcover and which costs less as each individual product.

  21. David Lledo says:

    I can not believe it! I just bought my personal license last May 30!
    And today I read that if I want Resharper 8 I’ll have to pay again!!!

  22. Mark says:

    @jura
    The problem is you’ve already got annoyed customers. I knew v8 was imminent but purchased v7 anyway, because I was led to believe that with previous major upgrades you had a grace period whereby new purchases could get the latest version free-of-charge. Sure I could have held off, or used a competitors product, but instead chose R#. Sure I could have double-checked how it would work, so you could knock this back and say it is my fault for using past-actions as a future indicator.
    Either way though, I’m annoyed I made my purchase when I did so making a change to prevent having annoyed customers hasn’t really panned out for you. Those of us in this transition between payment models will rightly feel more than a little hard done by.

  23. Sven says:

    @mark
    yes there is such a period but as long as I use R# they always announced it at some time during developing of vNext and never dated it back. so it looks like your fault however jetbrains could have added some note earlier when you automatically get v8 for v7.

    what you might forget also is that you can still work with v7 when v8 is released and for sure it will run in visual studio 2013. so if you don’t really need new features of v8 you could work with v7 till mid of 2014 and then upgrade to v8.

  24. Sven says:

    what I forgot you can also test new versions 30 days for free.
    when I think about how about this. if you are an owner of a previous R# version you can demand a 90 days test license for the current version?

  25. Mark says:

    @sven
    Yes, it probably is my fault – as I mentioned – for thinking it would be handled how it had been handled in the past.
    In April, I was thinking of buying resharper and had seen that v8 was due for release in the next couple of months (from when I was looking). But I also looked back to see how they handled the transition from major-release to major-release.
    I found evidence that they, very reasonably, provided free upgrades for people that had made a purchase within X months of the release of the new version (have a look at the IntelliJIDEA upgrade page at the moment … if you purchased v11 after November 2012 you can still get free upgrade to v12 some 8 months later).

    So my (wrong) assumption was that I didn’t need to hold off making a purchase and I could buy v7 now and so long as v8 came out within the expected time-frame I’d be able to get the new one for free. So they got my money sooner, and I got my tool sooner.

    If I’d known then what I know now would I have made the purchase? No.

    It may be my fault, but it leaves a sour taste still.

  26. @Mark
    Well this transition to subscription-based licensing is in a sense an equivalent of past “buy now, get vNext for free” campaign if you think about it: in both cases you buy the product while its latest version is 7 and get a free upgrade to the upcoming new version.

    I understand that you feel annoyed with making a purchase at a wrong time but there’s really not much we can do. I’m not sure what was the exact date of your purchase but if it was within 1 month back from June 1, I suggest that you contact sales so that they can offer you special upgrade conditions.

  27. @David Lledo Please contact sales: for a purchase made on May 30 I’m sure they’ll give you a free transition to a subscription-based license that would include a free upgrade to v8.

  28. @David Lay
    We don’t like making people left out, that’s for sure. If you’ve also made a recent purchase (say, sometime in May), consider contacting sales as well and explaining your case.

  29. @Scully
    instead of being able to buy a ReSharper 7 license when version 8 hits beta and get a free upgrade to 8, including all minor releases, it means that in a year you’ll no longer get bug fixes to a product you’ve paid for.
    That’s not exactly true: within a year, you get free upgrades to all new versions; after a year, you still get free upgrades to two-point releases (e.g. from 8.1 to 8.1.1 and 8.1.2).

    On top of that, what if you want to skip a version? As I understand what’s on the Jetbrains website, you pay full price.
    You only pay full price if more than a year has passed since the day when you previous upgrade subscription has expired. If less than a year has expired, you can renew at a reduced price, and the new renewal period back-dates to the end of the previous subscription term. This scheme does favor regular updates but on the upside there’s the benefit of a predictable upgrade schedule: you never pay to renew any more frequent than once a year.

    I really hope Jetbrains don’t try pulling this crap for IntelliJ too
    Eventually IntelliJ IDEA will come to the upgrade subscription mechanism, too, as we’re trying to unify licensing schemes across products.

  30. @RH As I explained to Scully above, you still get upgrades to two-point releases after your subscription has expired.

    Your license is perpetual anyway, to the latest version included in your subscription. Whether to renew your subscription or not is still up to you. If you choose not to, you can still use this latest version that you’re licensed to, without any time restrictions.

  31. @Frazell Thomas
    My understanding of how this new license scheme is going to work is that we’ll still get the right to use the version of ReSharper we have forever, but we’ll also get the ability to upgrade free within a year. Meaning if we buy it now with the subscription we’ll get ReSharper 9 if it drops within a year, but that won’t affect our ability to skip ReSharper 9 and stay with 8.
    Your understanding is absolutely correct.

    What I’m really unclear about is how minor updates are affected. Do we need this subscription to get a version upgrade to 8.1? I hope not as this has never been the case in the past.
    Within a year of your upgrade subscription, you get free upgrades to all new versions: majors, point-releases and two-point releases (also three-point, four-point etc. if only we had them); after a year, you still get free upgrades to two-point releases (e.g. from 8.1 to 8.1.1 and 8.1.2) but upgrading to a major release or a point release will require a subscription renewal.
    Depending on the way how your upgrade subscription term is aligned with our release schedule, you indeed may find yourself in a situation where you can’t upgrade for free to a point release. Say, if you buy a license with 1 year of upgrade subscription when the latest version is 8.1, you most probably qualify for a free upgrade to 9.0 but 9.1 requires a renewal (although 9.0.1 and 9.0.2 do not even if they are released after the expiry of your original subscription term). If you think about it, this is not very much different from the traditional per-major-release licensing model whereby any license would normally enable you to use two significant releases: a major release (say, 7.0) and a fat, feature-packed point release that follows up such as 7.1. In this regard, the subscription scheme is more flexible as it allows stacking the usual two significant releases in both directions: first major then point release or first point release then the next major.

    The additional question is what happens when you skip an upgrade? How will renewing the subscriptions be priced and work.
    Here’s a quote from license terms regarding renewals: “Subscription renewals commence from the expiration of your previous subscription period, regardless of when the subscription renewal is actually purchased.”
    In other words, if more than a year has passed since the expiry date of your previous upgrade subscription, you pay full price. If less than a year has expired, you renew at a reduced price (60% of new license), and the new renewal term is backdated to the end of the previous subscription term.

  32. @Sven
    During 1-year upgrade subscription you’re getting all updates; as soon as it expires, you’re still eligible for two-point updates (such as 7.1.1, 7.1.2 etc.)

    Talking about a universal subscription, would you be able to elaborate a bit? Would this be for use in your company or for your personal use? On another note, what we currently offer is the .NET tools pack that is subject to 35% off upon request to JetBrains sales.

    As to an extended trial for users of older versions, we’re always open to give an extended trial upon request.

  33. @Jeff
    Not only are we not receiving the benefit of a free upgrade as has been offered in the past, it sounds like we must pay a full upgrade fee also.
    Actually the transition to subscription-based licensing is a “legalized” free upgrade offer if you think about it. They’re equivalents: in both cases you buy now, you get a free upgrade to the upcoming major version. In both cases the upgrade price stays the same: 60% of new license price tag.

    I think there should be a grace period or pro-rated upgrade for people who have just made their purchase within the last 6 months at least.
    I don’t really see how this is substantiated. For all personal purchases made within a month back from June 1, we recommend contacting sales so that they could facilitate the licensees in transitioning to subscription.

    I find it improbable that ReSharper will be releasing more than 1 major update every year, and if there is not new features in the point releases, then what are we really paying for?
    If you look at ReSharper’s release history in the past 3 years, there’s a pattern of a major release followed by a full-featured point release (5.1, 6.1, 7.1). This is a pattern that we’re going to follow further.

  34. Scully says:

    @Jura Gorohovsky

    Thank-you for your response. It’s good that we get very minor releases even after subscription expiry, but I’m really not keen on the renewal deal. If I didn’t renew my subscription until 6 months after it expires, I would expect it to start from that date, not backdate to a period when I wasn’t getting any benefit! From a business point of view, this seems a little self defeating for JetBrains as people who leave it more than a year after their subscription expires have no incentive to choose JetBrains over a competitor, despite possibly being a customer for several years. I know subscription models are considered great for businesses as they provide regular and predictable sources of income, however personal users will often want to skip versions to save money and with this subscription model, that’s no longer an option. Personally I doubt I use 50% of ReSharper’s features and, providing it works with the latest version of VS, I’m quite happy with it the way it is. Thus I’d be happy to only ever upgrade when the version of ReSharper no longer supports a new version of VS that I’m using – but again, with your new licensing model, when I come to renew after a few years, no discount. And as for not having to pay for an upgrade more than once a year, I’ve never had to do this. When have you released a major version of IntelliJ or ReSharper within less than a year of the previous major version?

    It’s a shame that you’re planning on this model for IntelliJ too. Since most of my dev is in .Net, I’ll probably stick with the free versions of IntelliJ in future as that really is a product which I don’t want to upgrade every year.

    If this subscription model really was such a benefit to customers over the previous model, then why not offer both options and let the customer decide? I think it’s because we all know the truth – if we had an option, there would be a single digit percentage of your personal customers choosing a subscription. I do appreciate the personal licensing option, but why undo all the good you’ve done with it by moving to a subscription?

  35. @Scully Looks like you’ve been unlucky to fall into minority of per-version-licensing fanbase in this case. That’s certainly not the best situation to be in but considering that we’re coming up with promotions from time to time that involve huge discounts on new personal licenses, you can still migrate to new versions every couple of years without being hurt by the downside of subscription-based licensing.

    As to offering two options (one including subscription and the other not), we would have probably chosen this path had we not had 3 editions of ReSharper instead of 1 (which would have summed up to a really impressive set of specific products to upgrade from version to version and/or from edition to edition, move from per-major-version to subscription-based license, renew while downgrading edition etc.) and had we not been investigating options to update product editioning (if we ever do that, this would just raise complexity of internal upgrade/renew products to an unprecedented level). In short, we’ve voted for simplicity in this case, believe it or not.

  36. Mark says:

    @jura

    RE: is in a sense an equivalent of past “buy now, get vNext for free” campaign if you think about it

    Maybe from 1st June it is – as you say, it is now “legalized” or official rather than being done ad-hoc. Unfortunately I’m the other side of that new boundary line … but when I made the purchase thought I’d be on the right side of it.

    RE: I’m not sure what was the exact date of your purchase but if it was within 1 month back from June 1, I suggest that you contact sales so that they can offer you special upgrade conditions.

    April, rather than May, so I guess I’ll see what happens.

  37. Olaf says:

    Apparently I got suckered into this model.
    The promise is that we will get regular updates.

    Resharper 8.0 came out 05 August 2013
    Resharper 8.1 came out 16 December 2013.

    We are 1 Feb 2014 now, no news that Resharper 8.2 will come out soon.

    And what worries me is that Resharper 8.3 will come out just before my subscription ends, while people that waited 1 month to start the subscription will have the 8.3 free available to them.

    Early subscribers gets punished.

    • Jura Gorohovsky says:

      Olaf, I’m afraid you misunderstand ReSharper release cycle.

      A regular pattern for ReSharper releases, the one that holds true for 4+ years already, is that for we make a major release (the most recent of those was 8.0), follow it up by one or more maintenance releases (8.0.1 and 8.0.2), then roll out a minor release (8.1) and another one or several maintenance releases (we’re getting ready for 8.1.1 and we might make more maintenance releases of the 8.x family if 8.1.1 happens to contain considerable issues). That’s all. We’re not going to release 8.2, 8.3 or any more minor releases in the 8.x family. The next thing we’re working on is 9.0 which we’re hopefully going to open EAP for sometime during Spring.

      If 9.0 is released within a year of your license purchase date, you’re going to get it for free (+ any maintenance follow-ups before 9.1 – say, 9.0.1, even if they’re released later than your subscription ends.)

      Considering this pattern, I’m not sure that your concerns are justified.

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