Plugin Deprecations in IntelliJ IDEA v2019.2

Dmitry Jemerov

Over the years, IntelliJ IDEA has accumulated support for a large array of technologies, and many of the technologies are no longer being actively maintained. We know that there are still people using these technologies, and up until now, we’ve been maintaining the plugins for them as part of the main IntelliJ IDEA source repository. However, our project has been growing, and carrying around this excess baggage is getting more and more difficult both for our users (as the plugins affect the size of the installation and potentially the performance of the IDE) and for our development team. At the same time, we’ve established procedures for maintaining a stable third-party plugin API, so we’re confident that moving the plugins out of the main repository will not affect their stability as the IDE evolves.

Starting with IntelliJ IDEA v2019.2, we’re going to move a number of plugins to a separate repository. These plugins will no longer be bundled with IntelliJ IDEA, and we will not be updating these plugins together with IntelliJ IDEA releases. However, you will still be able to download the plugins from the plugin repository, and we’ll try to fix any critical issues in the plugins if any are reported. The new repository is open-source, so you’re able to submit pull requests with fixes and improvements, and if you do, we will release updates of the plugins with your changes included.

The specific plugins affected by this in v2019.2 are:

  • Struts 1.x and Tiles
  • JsTestDriver
  • J2ME

We plan to continue with deprecation in future releases. Plugins considered for deprecation in v2019.3 include:

  • Tapestry
  • Google App Engine (superseded by Google’s Cloud Code plugin)
  • Emma code coverage
  • Geronimo

Cheers,
Your IntelliJ IDEA team

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15 Responses to Plugin Deprecations in IntelliJ IDEA v2019.2

  1. Christopher Lail says:

    June 18, 2019

    I strongly encourage you not to deprecate the Tapestry plugin. We have major projects that utilize Tapestry and love the plugin.

    • Dmitry Jemerov says:

      June 19, 2019

      Unfortunately the Tapestry plugin is implemented in a non-optimal way and affects the performance of users who have the plugin enabled and do not use Tapestry (and that’s the majority of our user base – most people don’t disable plugins that they do not use). Rewriting the plugin to avoid the performance cost would be a significant investment, and we’re reluctant to do so given that we see very limited use of the plugin.

      • Pedro Borges says:

        June 20, 2019

        So because people don’t manage their IDE’s plugins, the rest lot will lose key functionality?

        I don’t think you guys are being reasonable here, optimal or non optimal the tapestry plugin is paramount when your application is Tapestry based and removing it is an irresponsible move with drastic consequences to the “few” that use it.

        It is not a matter of how many projects use it, it is a matter of how critical it is for those projects.

        Make it disabled by default, add a warning, whatever… but don’t pull the rug right from under your client’s feet like that. I’ll tell you what costs more than rewriting the plugin – rewriting big applications to migrate from tapestry to something else – and that is a cost your customers will accrue due to this decision.

        • Dmitry Jemerov says:

          June 21, 2019

          You are not losing any functionality. You can keep using IntelliJ IDEA 2019.2, or you can install the Tapestry plugin from the plugin manager in 2019.3 or newer versions of IDEA. Of course we’re not expecting anyone to migrate their applications to a different framework because of decisions made by their IDE vendor.

          • Pedro Borges says:

            June 21, 2019

            That is a load off, thanks.

  2. WJ says:

    June 18, 2019

    Please reconsider Tapestry.
    I’ll switch to other IDE, because it is must have for me.

    • Dmitry Jemerov says:

      June 19, 2019

      Sure, you’re welcome to choose whatever product works for you. Note that deprecating the plugin does not mean that it will stop working – you’ll still be able to install and use it.

      • Pedro Borges says:

        June 20, 2019

        You are missing the point, we all know we are free to choose whichever product works for us, that is not the point, the point is we are being *forced* by JetBrains to opt out of Idea.

        What does that say about your customer relations?

    • Tim van der Leeuw says:

      June 19, 2019

      You can still use it, it’s not being removed. But it will not be available as a default plugin, you’ll have to manually install it.

    • Emmanuel Sowah says:

      June 19, 2019

      Switch to which? Tell me which other IDE on the market that offers a Tapestry plugin. This sounds like an emotional decision and not one based on technical merits.

      • Dmitry Jemerov says:

        June 19, 2019

        IntelliJ IDEA 2019.2 offers a Tapestry plugin. See my comment above for a technical motivation of this decision.

        • Mark Y says:

          June 20, 2019

          I think Emmanuel was replying to WJ, not to you 🙂

  3. Emmanuel Sowah says:

    June 19, 2019

    I think it is a good move to deprecate Tapestry. It’s used by only a few people. Even the creator of it has abandoned it and using other modern frameworks.

  4. Edoardo Luppi says:

    June 19, 2019

    A technical curiosity. How much space were you able to save by removing those plug-ins? And how much are you aiming at?

  5. Joe says:

    June 25, 2019

    Reading comprehension isn’t a strong point for people is it? The blog post clearly says those plugins will still be available for install, they just won’t be bundled.

    Read before you complain.

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