CLion 2019.2.2 Bug-fix Update

Hi,

A new bug-fix update, CLion 2019.2.2 (build 192.6603.37), is now available for download from our website, via the Toolbox App, or via snap (for Ubuntu). A patch update will be available shortly. If you haven’t updated to v2019.2 yet, now’s a good time to do so.

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Fixes for parameter name hints

CLion 2019.2 introduced a new feature called Parameter Hints. These are the names of function parameters for passed arguments, which are displayed in the editor in line with your code to help increase its readability.

In this bug-fix update, we’ve fixed a few issues related to Parameter Hints in CLion:

  • There is a default black-list now for C++ Parameter Hints. It includes std::min/max, std::forward, std::vector::push_back, strcmp / strncmp, and some others:

Hint blacklist

  • Parameter hints now correctly handle brace elision in aggregate initialization:

Brace ellision

  • In pack expansion, the & hint is now shown for all the parameters.
  • Now, CLion doesn’t show a hint if there’s a comment matching the hint / parameter name. It recognizes comments in the form of /*NAME=*/ (the = can be any character and NAME must match the hint for that argument).
  • A Parameter Hint is now shown before NULL.

Bundled LLDB on Catalina macOS

macOS 10.15 Catalina is gonna be released soon, so we’ve made sure the bundled LLDB works there (CPP-17126). There are still some possible warnings (CPP-17268), but they don’t seem to prevent debugging.

JetBrains Runtime update

Finally, JBR 11 has been updated and addresses the following issues:

  • Fixed the corrupted fonts on the Welcome Screen on Windows (JBR-1777).
  • Fixed the issue that caused incorrect font (italics) in the editor (JBR-1778).

The full list of JBR improvements can be found here.

IDE release notes are also available.

Your CLion Team
JetBrains
The Drive to Develop

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CLion 2019.2.1 Bug-fix Update

Hi,

CLion 2019.2 was released just a few weeks ago, and now we are ready to give you the first bug-fix update. CLion 2019.2.1 (build 192.6262.62) is now available for download from our website, via the Toolbox App, or via snap (for Ubuntu). A patch update will be available shortly. If you haven’t updated to v2019.2 yet, now’s a good time to do so.

DOWNLOAD CLION

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What’s Next? CLion 2019.3 Roadmap

CLion 2019.2 landed just a few days ago. Do check it out if you haven’t yet! It’s got a lot of cool things for Embedded developers, an experimental debugger for the MSVC toolchain, a more flexible and reliable Unused Includes check, parameter code hints, and much more. Here is a fantastic video from Phil Nash to quickly take you through the key highlights.

Meanwhile, we are moving forward and thinking through our future updates and the next release. But before we share our plans, let’s take a minute to give our sincerest thanks to the most active evaluators, who helped us make v2019.2 more stable and accurate.

Special thanks

We want to thank all the users – more than 4 thousand in total! – who participated in the 2019.2 Early Access Program. You helped us immensely with the huge variety of possible setups and configurations, and even a few general issues we somehow missed. We greatly appreciate your help!

Continuing our ongoing tradition, we present our most active EAP evaluators with a full 1-year subscription to CLion, which can be redeemed as a new subscription or an extension of a current one. So, here are the contributors that we want to give special thanks:

  • Dmytro Nezhevenko
  • Ivan Stepanov
  • Patrick Turley

You will receive a personal email with details on how to claim your license. (If for some reason you do not get an email from us within a week, ping us here in the comments!)

CLion 2019.3 roadmap

We take application performance and code quality very seriously. Following the internal performance week / hackathon that our team held together with the IntelliJ Platform team this June, we are now planning a special Quality-targeted Release. Here’s what that means in simple words:

  1. We’ll work to flesh out and implement the fresh ideas and fixes we tried during our performance hackathon.
  2. We plan to work intensively on various performance boosts, including some massive overhauls we started earlier this year. You can expect a series of blog posts covering the progress and explaining the underlying ideas, with some measurements on referenced projects so that you can compare them with your cases.
  3. We plan to focus on fixing issues and eliminating pain-points in different areas, rather than introducing new functionality. (Don’t forget to upvote the pain-points that affect you the most, so that we can prioritize them to help as many users as possible!)
  4. We still plan to continue our work in the directions we feel are important, such as covering Makefiles support and some others. Please read on for the details.

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CLion 2019.2 has landed with new functionality for Embedded Developers, experimental MSVC debugger, updated Unused Includes check, parameter hints, and much more

CLion 2019.2, the second big update this year, is here now! It brings improvements for Embedded Developers and adds more debugging abilities – including an experimental debugger for the Microsoft Visual C++ toolchain. That’s not all, there’s a fully-reworked Unused Includes check, enhancements in the editor, improved performance, and more.

CLion 2019.2 banner

To update to this version use the Toolbox App, snap package (on Ubuntu), our website, or the patch-update from the latest build of 2019.1.

DOWNLOAD CLION 2019.2

In brief, here are the main improvements:

Read on for the details or check out this short What’s New video by Phil Nash:

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CLion 2019.2 Release Candidate is Here

Hi,

Please welcome the Release Candidate for the upcoming CLion 2019.2!

To install CLion 2019.2 RC (build 192.5728.70), download it from the website, update from our Toolbox App, or use a snap package (for Ubuntu). Please note that to use CLion 2019.2 RC, you need to either have an active subscription or start a 30-day evaluation period. No patches are provided for this release candidate, but you can expect a patch from the latest 2019.1.4 update to the 2019.2 release version.

DOWNLOAD CLION 2019.2 RC

This builds brings some cosmetics updates to the recently added Peripherals View. We’ve also fixed some issues related to that view, like having to click the load button twice (CPP-16730) and some incorrect cells coloring in the table (CPP-16746).

In the 2019.2 EAP builds, we’ve enabled an experimental LLDB-based debugger for the Microsoft Visual C++ toolchain. It was also available for MinGW under the same experimental setting. However, while the debugger for MSVC is more or less stable and the improvement path is clear enough, for MinGW the quality was not satisfactory. We’ve decided to turn it off for now, even under the experimental setting, leaving only the MSVC debugger available.

The full release notes are available here.

Your CLion Team
JetBrains
The Drive to Develop

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CLion 2019.2 Hits Beta

CLion 2019.2 goes Beta! To install CLion 2019.2 Beta (build 192.5728.28), download it from the website, update from our Toolbox App, get it through a snap package (if you are using Ubuntu), or use a patch update.

DOWNLOAD CLION 2019.2 BETA

blog@2x

Beta builds are much more stable than EAP builds, but some issues may still occur. If you find any issues, please report them to our issue tracker. You don’t need a license to use this build.

The main highlights:

  • The updated ‘Unused includes’ check no longer hangs in a batch mode (run via run inspection by name)
  • A fix for the issue with the freezing rename refactoring when invoked from the context menu (CPP-16768)
  • A fix for the code highlighting disappearing after a file was saved when the parameter name hints were enabled (CPP-16741)

The full release notes are available here.

Your CLion Team,
JetBrains
The Drive to Develop

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CLion 2019.2 EAP: Peripheral View for ARM Devices

Hi,

A new CLion 2019.2 EAP (build 192.5587.18) is now available. Download the full build from our site, install it via the Toolbox App, or use a snap package for Ubuntu. A patch-update for the previous EAP build will be available shortly.

DOWNLOAD CLION 2019.2 EAP

This build introduces the Peripheral view for ARM embedded devices.

What do you need to start with it in CLion?

The Peripheral view in CLion is shown during debugging for two types of Run/Debug configurations: Embedded GDB Server and OpenOCD Download & Run. So, first, you need to have a configuration. When you run it, you’ll see the Peripherals tab in the Debug tool window with an invitation to load the .svd file:
peripherals_load

Second, you need is an .svd file, which is a standard ARM file with the definitions of peripheral registers. MCU vendors publish them along with the chip documentation, or you can find them inside various SDKs or libraries.

Select the file and the active peripherals to show:
peripherals_select_active

That’s it!
peripherals_loaded

A few notes on the Peripherals tab

You can switch between Decimal, Octal, Hex, and Binary views of the peripheral value via the context menu:
peripherals_mode

Note the peripherals are read-only for now. We plan to implement a read-write mode later.

If you need to search for a particular value, just start typing the name:
peripherals_search

On the Peripherals tab, you can also find a few useful buttons:

  • The Stop refreshing button stops the on-the-fly updates to the peripherals on stepping. It can be useful if the operation is time-consuming. And with the Refresh button, you can trigger an update manually.
  • The Configure button opens the Load .svd file dialog. By the way, you can load several .svd files at once and select the active peripherals you need from each one.
  • Export as CSV to Clipboard and Open as CSV in Editor can be useful if you want to compare peripherals from several runs or save it for the future investigation.

Last but not least, this EAP build bundles GDB 8.3.

The full release notes are available here.

DOWNLOAD CLION 2019.2 EAP

Your CLion Team
JetBrains
The Drive to Develop

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CLion 2019.2 EAP: MSVC Debugger, Unused Includes Check, and More

Hi,

A new CLion 2019.2 EAP (build 192.5438.15) is now available. Download the full build from our site, install it via the Toolbox App, or use a snap package if you are using Ubuntu. A patch-update for the previous EAP build will be available shortly.

The main highlights:

DOWNLOAD CLION 2019.2 EAP

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CLion 2019.2 EAP: fixes for Debugger and Parameter hints

Hi,

A new CLion 2019.2 EAP (build 192.5281.33) is now available. Download the full build from our site, install it via the Toolbox App, or use a snap package if you are using Ubuntu. A patch-update for the previous EAP build will be available shortly.

DOWNLOAD CLION 2019.2 EAP

Parameter Name Hints

The first 2019.2 EAP introduced Parameter name hints that helps with the code readability by showing the names of function parameters for passed arguments. This build brings a few important fixes for it:

  • Fixed the freezes in the IDE caused by parameter hints (CPP-16494).
  • A parameter name hint was added for an argument which is a constructor without parameters (CPP-16423):
    constructor_hints
  • A parameter name hint was added for the this pointer (CPP-16312):
    this_hints

Debugger

This EAP also brings a set of fixes in Debugger:

  • Fixed the bug with the evaluate an expression with GDB. It gets constantly re-evaluated each time the debugger refreshes the variables view (CPP-7358).
  • Fixed the issue with GDB when a variable’s value is not updated on stepping after “Set value” command (CPP-13295).
  • Fixed the GDB hangs in the case of MinGW-w64 and multi-line commands(CPP-9090).

And more

Among the other changes:

  • Commit from the Local Changes for projects that use Git or Mercurial as their version control system (see the blog post for more details).
  • Windows Defender performance warning (see the blog post for more details)
  • Remove false positives with constructors marked as unused, if created via std::make_shared.
  • Fixed the issue with the macro replacement in quick documentation which was not working when ClangFormat is enabled(CPP-16244).

The full release notes are available here.

Your CLion Team
JetBrains
The Drive to Develop

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The Developer Ecosystem in 2019: Key Trends for C, C++, and a bit of Rust

As a tool vendor, we keep our finger permanently on the pulse with what’s going on in terms of key trends and important changes in the development world. As our IDEs cover lots of languages and technologies, there is a lot of ground to cover in all different directions. In the C++ team, we are obviously most interested in the C and C++ ecosystems and the related languages and technologies around them.

The Developer Ecosystem survey, which JetBrains runs yearly, aims to reveal all this kind of information. And today we are happy to share with you the results of the 2019 edition of this survey. Especially, we’ll take a closer look at the most interesting things we’ve found from this year’s study related to C, C++, and there’s even a bit about Rust too at the end.

VIEW THE STATE OF DEVELOPER ECOSYSTEM 2019 REPORT

Top C discoveries

The most interesting findings regarding C development were about the various tooling adoption. The project models distribution has mostly remained unchanged from 2018, however, Makefiles has secured itself a stronger position with 50%. A similar situation can be seen with the compilers, where GCC is trending, but Clang has grown its share from 23% to 35%:
C compilers
A new question on dependency and package management tools was introduced this year that led to the discovery that for the C language 60% don’t use any dependency manager, while 22% rely on a system package manager. Nuget and Conan lead the list of specific dependency managers, with 6% of the share for each:
C dependency managers
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