Live Webinar: Remote Development with CLion

CLion v2018.3 comes with Remote Development support. What is remote development and why is it useful? How does CLion support it?

It’s actually a cloud of activities which different developers can take different parts from, depending on what their goals are. In this webinar, we’re going to look at all these parts, so you know what’s available, and then look at how CLion enables, automates, and simplifies the whole process.

Join us on Thursday, February 28th, 5:00 PM – 6:00 PM CET (11:00 AM – 12:00 PM EST).

CLion_remote

Register now!

Space is limited.

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CLion 2018.3.3 bug-fix update

Hi,

A new bug-fix update, CLion 2018.3.3, build 183.5153.40, is now available for download. You can get it from our website, via Toolbox App, or using snap packages (for Ubuntu). A patch-update will be available shortly.

Download CLion

This build has a few important fixes for bugs in different areas:

  • Incorrect “CMake executable not found” error in the case of several WSL toolchains installed.
  • An exception while collecting compiler information from on the remote host (if you’ve experienced CPP-14505 or CPP-14477 errors, please, check if these problems are resolved as well).
  • Build All command was building twice.

Besides, in this build, CLion provides better error indication if the compiler has not been resolved correctly when a compilation database project is used.

Full release notes are here.

Interested in seeing what we have in the works? Check out our roadmap for CLion 2019.1.

Your CLion Team
JetBrains
The Drive to Develop

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Happy Holidays from CLion Team!

Hi all,

The year 2018 is coming to an end, and we’d like to take this moment to have a short look at all the great things that have happened this year in the C++ community and with CLion in particular!

season_greeting_clion

C++ language

Back in 2017, we officially got a new C++ standard, while this year the C++ Committee managed to reach a consensus on many important topics for C++20!

Ranges, Concepts, Contracts, and many constexpr additions were merged into C++20.

The Modules design was approved and now it’s time for the wording specification work! We still have hopes for Modules in C++20, but even getting them in C++23 will be a huge win for the whole C++ community.

There are several proposals being widely discussed this year! Take a closer look if you haven’t read them yet – they are really worth it and will definitely change the way we develop in C++:

C++ conferences and community events

The number of C++ related conferences and community events keeps growing. The pivotal worldwide events such as CppCon, ACCU, C++Now, and Meeting C++ are all evolving, trying new formats, getting bigger, and attracting more and more C++ developers.

CppCon 2018 was huge, bidding a final farewell to Bellevue, Seattle, WA, and awarding Jon Kalb, conference organizer and Chair, for all his fantastic work on making the conference what it is today. The conference tried out some new activities this year – Lightning Challenges, Tool Time, and a new Exhibition format. And of course, as usual, bringing with it a lot of great high-quality C++ content. Get more details in our trip report.

In 2019, several brand new conferences are starting – don’t miss out on joining us at C++ on Sea in the UK and Core C++ in Israel!

CLion

In the CLion team, we rolled out 3 major releases this year, finally bringing to our users Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) and Full Remote Mode support, and starting a new complementary language engine based on Clangd. We also added Gradle and compilation database project formats, bundled Databases and SQL functionality, and integrated CPU profilers into CLion. Our plans for 2019 are even bigger!

What is more important, we’ve made the product much more stable and responsive (some issues are still there, but there are fixes planned for 2019). We finally reached 160K developers per month using CLion! Surprisingly, most of them are on Windows now, with Linux in second place and macOS in third. There is also still huge potential to grow and dozens of great opportunities for CLion’s future evolution.

We are happy to have some new members join our CLion family and reveal a few hidden talents in the team:
3F5A0069

We are excited to become more active in the C++ Committee and build an even a stronger relationship with the C++ developers around the globe.

Season’s Greetings from the CLion Team and all of us as JetBrains!

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CLion 2018.3.2 bug-fix update

Hi,

Please welcome the second bug-fix update for CLion 2018.3 – 2018.3.2, build 183.4886.39. Get this fresh build from our website or via Toolbox App, or use snap packages (for Ubuntu). A patch-update will be available shortly.

Download CLion

The highlights from this build include:

The full release notes are available here.

Interested to see what we have in the works? Check out our roadmap for CLion 2019.1.

Your CLion Team
JetBrains
The Drive to Develop

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CLion 2018.3.1 bug-fix update

Hi,

As you probably know, a big CLion 2018.3 update happened recently. It introduced initial remote development support, CPU profilers on Linux and macOS, and much more.

Today we are happy to announce the first bug-fix update for CLion 2018.3 – 2018.3.1, build 183.4588.63. Get this fresh build from our website, update via Toolbox App, or use snap packages (for Ubuntu). A patch-update will be available shortly.

Download CLion

Bundled Remote Terminal

You can launch an SSH Session right from CLion now. Invoke it via Tools | Start SSH Session, and then configure a new session or select one from the list:
remote_ssh

Other fixes and enhancements:

The full release notes are available here.

Interested to know what’s in the works? See our roadmap for CLion 2019.1.

Your CLion Team
JetBrains
The Drive to Develop

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Moving into 2019. CLion roadmap

This year’s third big update – CLion 2018.3 – has landed just a few days ago! It’s all about Remote Development, CPU profiling, and better C++ language support.

Following our good tradition, we want to thank those evaluators who have helped us ship so many goodies and still keep the release stable. Our special thanks go to:

  • Oliver Stöneberg
  • Michael Klatt
  • Dmytro Nezhevenko

In appreciation of your efforts, we are giving each of you a free 1-year subscription for CLion (to extend your current subscription or get a new one). You will receive a personal email with details on how to claim your license. If for some reason you do not get an email from us within a week, ping us here in the comments!

Roadmap: CLion in 2019

Our main areas of focus for next year:

  1. Boost performance & eliminate freezes
  2. Wider integration with Clangd-based language engine
  3. Embedded development support

These 3 areas will occupy most of our time and resources and will entail hundreds of various tasks. For example, Embedded development is a huge and diverse area, and our first step will be into the STM32 family of boards. At the same time, it will require lots of changes and improvements in debugger support, project models, and so on. Even if you don’t do Embedded development, you may still benefit from CLion taking this path.

Plan for CLion 2019.1

Note: The following is a preliminary plan; we cannot guarantee that all of the features listed below will be included in CLion 2019.1.
  • Embedded Development

  • Debugger
    • Rework experimental hex implementation
    • Add memory view to CLion
    • Add disassembler view for LLDB debugger (only available for GDB for now)
    • Work on debugger for MSVC on Windows (this might not be finished by the time 2019.1 is released, but some experimental preview will likely be available)
  • C++ support
    • Better indicators related to the Clangd-based engine (in order to measure the memory and CPU usage for this new engine on the user’s side)
    • Wider integration with Clangd-based language engine: the next candidate is syntax highlighting
    • Various bug-fixes in CLion’s own language engine
  • Performance improvements and elimination of freezes: here we plan to focus on memory and CPU usage, investigate deeper first project indexing times and completion performance.
  • Formatter: Clang-format integration
    • In reformat action
    • On the commit stage
    • Automatic Clang-format config detection
  • Project models: continue detaching the API

That’s it! Do you have any new feature requests? Send them to our tracker. We’re listening!

Your CLion Team

JetBrains
The Drive to Develop

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CLion 2018.3 released: remote development, CPU profilers, C++17, clangd-based navigation, and VCS and editor improvements

This year we’ve focused on two areas to enhance CLion. The first is better C++ language support and general IDE performance improvements. As a result, we’ve added a clangd-based experimental complementary language engine, and a massive amount of work was done which, although invisible at first glance, has helped eliminate dozens of UI freezes in the editor.

The second area is the endless world of remote configurations. Starting with Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL), by the end of the year it has evolved into full remote development support.

Our efforts in both of these areas have culminated in this year’s final major release which is CLion 2018.3. Let’s look at all the goodies it brings with it in more detail!
CLion_183

2018.3 gathers the following changes under one roof:

Grab your free 30-day trial of CLion to evaluate the new features and improvements. Check them out in this quick demo from Phil Nash, or read on for more details:

Download CLion 2018.3

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CLion 2018.3 Release Candidate 2

Welcome the 2nd release candidate (build 183.4284.140) for CLion 2018.3!

Please note that to use CLion 2018.3 RC2, you need to have an active subscription (or start a 30-day evaluation period). No patches are provided for this release candidate, but you can expect a patch from the latest 2018.2.6 update to the 2018.3 release version.

Download CLion 2018.3 RC2

As things get closer to the official release, we are mostly working on the final fixes and improvements. If you notice any problems at all, please report them to our tracker.

This build delivers the following fixes:

  • IDE freeze: the IDE no longer freezes on typing related to clangd (CPP-14702)
  • WSL toolchain: CMake loading performance was improved (CPP-14700)
  • Search Everywhere: left and right side texts do not overlap now in the updated Search Everywhere dialog

Find the full release notes on our confluence page.

Bug-fix updated to 2018.1.7 and 2017.3.5

Along with the 2018.2.6 update published a week ago, we’ve just released updates for 2018.1 and 2017.3 version. You can get these updated from our Toolbox App or via patch-updates. The released builds are also available on our site.

Make sure to get these bug-fix updates if you are using macOS Mojave, as they include a fix for the input freezes (JRE-998).

Your CLion Team
JetBrains
The Drive to Develop

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CLion 2018.3 Release Candidate

Hi,

Please welcome the first Release Candidate for the upcoming CLion 2018.3!

Get the build (183.4284.104) from our website or use Toolbox app or snap packages (in the case of Ubuntu) to update. A patch-update will be available shortly for those using the previous EAP build. No license is required and the build is free to use, but it will expire within 30 days of the build date.

Download CLion 2018.3 RC

Here are some of the highlights:

  • For CPU Profiling on macOS we’ve fixed the “No data profiler” error, which happens in some cases.
  • Regression with the “Optimize Imports” action working incorrectly in case of the Clangd-based engine enabled.
  • Local build directory is no longer synchronized to the remote host (now it’s added to Excluded paths automatically).

The full release notes are available here.

Your CLion Team
JetBrains
The Drive to Develop

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CLion 2018.3 EAP: clangd-based navigation and search, CPU Profiler and remote mode improvements

Hi,

Please welcome a new CLion 2018.3 EAP (build 183.4284.40)!

As usual, a patch-update will be available shortly for those using the previous EAP build, and you can also use Toolbox app or snap packages (in the case of Ubuntu) to get this build.

No license is required and the build is free to use, but it will expire within 30 days of the build date.

Download CLion 2018.3 EAP

Clangd-based navigation and search

In CLion 2018.2 we’ve introduced an experimental complementary language engine, based on Clangd. Initially it worked only as an error annotator, providing code errors and warnings in the editor. Now it’s also used by CLion for some navigation and search actions:

  • Go to declaration (Ctrl+B on Win/Lin, ⌘B on macOS) / go to definition (Ctrl+Alt+B on Win/Lin, ⌥⌘B on macOS).
  • Highlighting references under caret.
  • Quick Documentation popup (Ctrl+Q on Win/Lin, F1 on macOS)
  • Find Usages (Alt+F7) – it uses Clangd-based engine to search through the files opened currently in the editor and CLion’s own engine for all the other usages.

CLion’s own engine is still in use for all the actions not listed above and also for the cases when Clangd-based engine fails. Besides, CLion adjusts the results it gets from Clangd in some cases (for example, it goes to the constructor not class declaration, when navigating from the constructor call).

Clangd-based language engine in CLion is turned on by default on all platforms. You can change the default configuration in Settings/Preferences | Languages & Frameworks | C/C++ | Clangd:
clangd_preferences
Note that if you’d like to turn off the Clangd-based engine completely in CLion, you need to uncheck all the options in this dialog.
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